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20110701
20110731
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toward a vote next week. the president says he still wants a big deal. but for the first time he's opening the door on senator mitch mcconnell's fall back plan which is gaining momentum on capitol hill. chuck todd was in the briefing room for the news conference. host of "the daily rundown" and luke russert. there was a movement from the president at least towards considering the mcconnell backup plan. what are the chances he still might get what he really wants which is a bigger deal? >> to me -- in a way put together to try to get through this. what you felt was the press conference was about was trying to frame the post game debate, if you will. you heard this from the speaker. suddenly they're back to distancing themselves from the debt ceiling. let's get to the debt ceiling part. we're running out of time on that. maybe there's still time to negotiate this grand bargain. that's sort of what i heard out of this. the president will sign anything that gets to his desk that seems to get through both houses of congress at this point. and then after that, maybe there's a conversat
to comment until you see some specifics. i think that the bottom line is in terms of an overall deal, the big holdup here is the fact that republicans have kept revenues off the table completely, even eric cantor yesterday, people said well, it's a great thing he says maybe he'll do a few of these egregious loopholes in the law, corporate jets and yachts and stuff like this, but even there, he had another loophole put in the law and none of the money that would be -- that comes from closing these loopholes would be used to reduce the deficit. so it's one step forward, two steps back. if republicans are willing to entertain serious revenues, there's a real chance for a big deal. if they're not, there's no chance for a big deal and i can tell you this. democrats are not going to go for something that says we have all these cuts that we'll put in the budget now and maybe we'll get revenues down the road, the ways and means committee or the finance committee will decide those down the road. leader reid issued a statement that i think sums up our view, that there has to be balance between cuts and
the table, the problem is so big we won't bo able to fix it and the politics are such that it's going to be impossible to get everybody around the table to come one a deal. it really is time for everybody to put these lines in the sand aside and start trying to fix the problem, which is what i think is gang of six did this week breathes a lot of new life into this whole discussion of how do we fix this problem in a way to get a lot of people to sign on and by doing it smartly that's going to help tremendously. >> do you think that the market, the rating agencies and others looking at it from the outside will take it seriously if there is some sort of agreement, a handshake whatever you call it between the president and the speaker of the house that has 217 votes and can get through the house, that there's an agreement for things that will be triggered down the road, is that going to be good enough, tax reform down the road? >> there's a lot of risk. people tend not to believe politicians doing hard things later. at the same time we need to lift the debt ceiling. we need to do that rig
, it made taxpayer funded bailouts illegal. so tax payers don't have to foot the bill if a big bank goes under. second, it said to wall street firms, you can't take the same kind of reckless risks that led to the crisis. and third, it put in place the stronger -- the strongest consumer protections in history. and make sure that these protections work so ordinary people were dealt with fairly so they could make informed decisions about their finances. we didn't just change the law. we changed the way the government did business. for years the job of protecting consumers was divided up in a lot of different agencies. so if you had a problem with the mortgage lender you called one place. if you had a problem with a credit card company, you called somebody else. it meant there were a lot of people who were, but that meant nobody was responsible. and we changed that. we cut the bureaucracy and put one consumer watchdog in charge with just one job. looking out for regular people in the financial system. this is an idea that i got from elizabeth warren who i first met years ago. back then this
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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